Why NSF Collects These Data

1.

At the institutional level, your data are combined with other science, engineering and health-related data to create institutional profiles. Many institutional research officers use these data in peer analyses to help determine future directions at their own institutions. Based on full-time student enrollment, the profiles rank your graduate school1 among all U.S. graduate schools, and present six aggregations specific to your institution:

  • Characteristics of full-time graduate students in science, engineering, and health-related fields
  • Characteristics of part-time graduate students in science, engineering, and health-related fields
  • Full-time graduate students in science, engineering and health-related fields receiving primary support from Federal sources, by field
  • Full-time graduate students in science, engineering and health-related fields, by type and primary source of support
  • Characteristics of postdocs and other doctorate-holding nonfaculty research staff in science, engineering and health-related fields
  • Characteristics of federally-supported postdocs and other doctorate-holding nonfaculty research staff in science, engineering and health-related fields
  • Postdocs in science, engineering and health-related fields receiving primary support from Federal sources, by field
  • Postdocs in science, engineering and health-related fields, by type and primary source of support


Institutional profiles are online at:  

https://ncsesdata.nsf.gov/profiles/


2.

At the national level, Congress, the Executive Branch, educational associations, and Federal agencies use summary tables comprised of graduate student survey data to analyze enrollment trends, identify up-and-coming science, engineering and health-related fields, and project enrollment deficits in fields vital to national interest. These trends help Federal agencies and other policy makers determine where to allocate future monies. For example, Federal agencies use these data to consider changes in levels and mechanisms of support for graduate students. Federal agencies also use these data, in conduction with other information, for program development and evaluation and in determining institutional eligibility for programs targeted to special populations and instructional programs. Summary tables are also used by many nonacademic employers to locate potential sources of future employees.  


Summary tables are online at:  

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/gradpostdoc


3.

NSF publishes two major reports on science and engineering in the United States:  Science and Engineering Indicators (SEI) and Women, Minorities and People with Disabilities in S&E(WMPD) are published bi-annually on a rotating basis.  SEI provides readers with an in-depth look at the S&E enterprise, both nationally and internationally, while the WMPD report presents statistical information on the participation of women, minorities and persons with disabilities in S&E education and employment.  


Reports can be found online at:

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind/


4.

Finally, the data you provide are added to the NCSES Interactive Data Tool, which provides centralized access for custom generation of statistics related to the science and engineering enterprise.  The NCSES Interactive Data Tool is available to the public for free allowing for the easy creation of custom tables using data from NCSES surveys.  




NCSES Interactive Data Tool is online at:

https://ncsesdata.nsf.gov/ids/



1All U.S. graduate schools with active departments in science, engineering and health-related fields.


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